40 Photos of Wild West Saloons That Capture the American Frontier in All Its Gritty Glory - Page 20 of 40 - Pens & Patron (2022)

Table of Contents
Orient Saloon – Bisbee, Arizona (1903) Wyatt Earp’s Northern Saloon – Tonopah, Nevada (1903) Matt H. Kerais’ Tavern – Kenosha, Wisconsin (1890s-1900s) The Arcade Saloon – Eldora, Colorado (1898) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1915) Unknown Saloon – Ehrenburg, Arizona Territory (c.1911) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890s) Unknown Saloon – Seattle, Washington (c.1918) Military Plaza Saloon – San Antonio, Texas (1876) Unknown Saloon – Everett, Washington (1907) Billy The Mugs Saloon – Seattle, Washington (c.1895) Long Branch Saloon – Dodge City, Kansas (1870-1885) Unknown Saloon – Arizona (1895) Gunn House Saloon – Sonora, California (1898) Perley McBride’s Shop – Unknown State (1906) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (Unknown Date) Shamrock Saloon – Hazen, Nevada (1905) The Klondyke Dance Hall and Saloon – Seattle, Washington (1909) Unknown Saloon, Unknown State (1903) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1927) Circle City Saloon – Nome, Alaska (1902) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1895) Unknown Courthouse and Saloon – Langtry, Texas (1900) Unknown Saloon – Alaska (Early 1900s) J. W. Swart’s Saloon – Charleston, Arizona (1885) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890s) Dew Drop Inn Saloon – Unknown State (c.1900) Toll Gate Saloon – Black Hawk, Colorado (1897) Wild West Bar – Unknown State (1900s) Brunswick Saloon – Telluride, Colorado (c.1900) Various Saloons – Rawhide, Arizona (Unknown Date) Road House Saloon – Bluff City, Alaska (c.1906) Behling Bros. Pool Room – Concord, Michigan (1892-1910) John Hoffman & Co. Saloon & Grocery – Unknown State (Unknown Date) Santos Saloon – Turlock, California (c.1908) “Temporary” Saloon – Turlock, California (c.1908) Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (Unknown Date) Charlie Binder’s Saloon – Ann Arbor, Michigan (1880) Unknown Saloon – Round Pond, Oklahoma Territory (1894) FAQs Videos

Did American frontier barrelhouses actually have two-way doors? What about the hairstyles and fashion of the times? We have some truly terrific old pictures of lounges in the American frontier, and the men who crossed through their doors.

Orient Saloon – Bisbee, Arizona (1903)

Bisbee was founded in 1880 as a copper, gold, and silver mining town, named in honor of one of the financial backers of the Copper Queen Mine – Judge DeWitt Bisbee.

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We can’t be certain what game is at play in the image above, but it almost looks like a variation of roulette, and a serious game at that – judging by the chips on the table!

Wyatt Earp’s Northern Saloon – Tonopah, Nevada (1903)

Wyatt Earp is somewhat of a legendary figure from the Old West, seeing as he was a jack-of-all-trades, ranging from frontiersman to boxing referee hustler to fugitive to eventually becoming a deputy marshall.

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Earp opened numerous saloons throughout the West at one point or another – including this one in Nevada – making a tidy profit from most of them. Earp became part-owner of the Northern Saloon in 1901, but sold the bar just four years later.

Matt H. Kerais’ Tavern – Kenosha, Wisconsin (1890s-1900s)

Kenosha rose to prominence in the late 19th century as an important Great Lakes shipping port, and later in the 20th century as a budding factory town producing millions of automobiles and trucks.

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So, where would weary shipmen and factory workers head after a hard shift in their respective jobs? To the tavern, of course – just like the one in the image above. You can almost smell the wooden flooring and ever-present smoke from the picture alone!

The Arcade Saloon – Eldora, Colorado (1898)

If you thought that Eldora sounds an awful lot like “Eldorado” – as in the mythical city of gold – then you wouldn’t be alone. Eldora was in fact previously known as “Eldorado”, then “El-Dora”, and was originally built as a mining town.

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By early 1898, one paper reported that the settlement “already [had] six flourishing saloons, with the prospects of a dozen more within a few days,” according to the website Western Mining History. It’s not so flourishing now though, given that as of 2020, there are less than 100 people living there.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890)

Goodness, just look at the wallpaper in this saloon, not to mention the worn flooring! Clearly, this was a popular place, and while we don’t have any information for the name of this tavern or where it was located, we do know the picture was taken sometime in 1890.

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Earlier in the century cowboys were few in number across the American West, though that began to change as the demand for beef in the industrialized north began to grow. By the 1870s, almost the entire country was full of cattle and their keepers.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1915)

Now this looks like a saloon catered towards a very specific sort of customer. Two card tables sit in close proximity to a pool table where these gentlemen pause their game to pose for the shot.

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Though the picture was taken towards the end of the Old West era in 1915, it’s still very much a stereotypical scene from frontier life. You may have even spotted the poster for Buffalo Bill on the rear wall, advertizing his latest Wild West-themed production.

Unknown Saloon – Ehrenburg, Arizona Territory (c.1911)

Named after its founder Herman Ehrenberg, the historical town of Ehrenburg (historical spelling) was founded in 1863 as Mineral City, but was renamed to ‘Ehrenburg’ in 1869. The town grew in size thanks to a steamboat landing that was established on its river, though with the introduction of railroads at the start of the 20th century the town began to fade away.

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Fitting, therefore, that this picture shows an automobile in Arizona, which must have been a foreign sight to the local population. One wonders what the driver was doing in such a tiny town – but perhaps he was stopping by the local saloon for a refreshment.

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Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890s)

Many of the images of the old frontier that survive today sadly don’t come with accompanying information to let us know where they were taken – but at least they do provide us with a good idea of what the saloons of the time looked like.

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Indeed, this particular bar could have been found anywhere from Arizona to Alaska, given their widespread uniformity. After all, these kinds of places didn’t need a unique selling point to survive – they just needed to provide the requisite refreshments and refuge for weary workers and travelers.

Unknown Saloon – Seattle, Washington (c.1918)

We can safely say that this is a prohibition-era shot of a saloon in Seattle, given that the Evergreen State started followed prohibition rules by the mid-1910s.

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That means that this watering hole could have been a speakeasy, or perhaps the bottles behind the bar are all for show. Or, arguably more likely but admittedly less fun, it’s possible this photo has been incorrectly dated. Regardless, all the patrons in it seem to be enjoying themselves.

Military Plaza Saloon – San Antonio, Texas (1876)

San Antonio was the site of several key battles during the Texas Revolution (1835-1836), including the famous Battle of the Alamo. At the time, the plaza was an open training ground for troops, and it was also the scene of a momentous transfer of power at the conclusion of the Texas Revolution in 1836.

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Fast forward to one year after this photograph was taken in 1876, and San Antonio became the latest U.S. city to join the railway network, bringing settlers in from all corners of the union.

Unknown Saloon – Everett, Washington (1907)

Look to the floor of this Washington saloon, and you’ll notice a few spittoons lining the floor. Their purpose? To catch any spit from the men at the bar. Charming, right? And very sanitary, we’re sure.

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Yes, spittoons were a common sight in the late 19th and early 20th century, as well as the bar rail that allowed patrons to lean and relax – not that they would be fighting for space, judging by the lack of customers in this particular establishment!

Billy The Mugs Saloon – Seattle, Washington (c.1895)

Immigrants first began flowing into the Pacific Northwest in the mid-19th century, where they held a surprisingly amicable relationship with the existing Native American people of the region – so much so that they named their settlement (Seattle) after the indigenous commander’s name.

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Billy the Mug’s was a notorious saloon that operated in Seattle’s Skid Road area, and was one of 13 saloons within the three-block Skid Road vice district at the time. Judging by the number of clients in the establishment from this photo, it was one of the more popular bars.

Long Branch Saloon – Dodge City, Kansas (1870-1885)

The undeniably fantastically named Dodge City (named after Fort Dodge) is famous for its history as a wild frontier town of the Old West. It was known as the “queen of the cow towns” due to its crucial involvement in the cattle trade.

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The Long Branch Saloon itself was the scene of several altercations, shoot-outs, gunfights, and standoffs. There was also a period where the community held no real legal infrastructure, but by 1886 the cowboys, saloon keepers and gamblers had packed up shop and moved on to greener pastures.

Unknown Saloon – Arizona (1895)

Ever heard of the card game ‘Faro’? The image below shows a few gentlemen enjoying a game. During the 1800s it was the preeminent card game of choice hosted in every Old West gambling house until it was eventually surpassed by poker in the early 1900s.

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The game was imported from France, and was popular due to its fast action, easy-to-learn rules, and better odds than most games of chance. A player would win (or lose) when cards turned up by the banker (dealer) match those already exposed on the table. The game had such favorable odds, in fact, that casinos soon struck it from their rosters.

Gunn House Saloon – Sonora, California (1898)

You may be surprised to learn that the Gunn House Saloon – now operating as the Gunn House Hotel – is still in business today. The saloon is named after Dr. Lewis C. Gunn, a native Philadelphian who was lured to the area to seek his fortune in the California gold mines.

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The image shows some modern features for a facility at the time, including electric lights and what appears to be a telephone in the corner. But of course, you still have the classic card games and bartender that were synonymous with saloons in the region at the time as well.

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Perley McBride’s Shop – Unknown State (1906)

Judging by how tidy and presentable this establishment – and its taverner – may have been an oddity from the more ‘rough and ready’ saloons throughout the frontier at the time. Or, perhaps, the early 20th century marked a shift to more presentable and orderly taverns.

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This is reflected by the sign that states, ‘NO LOAFING ALLOWED HERE’. Loafing is defined as “Keepin’ ‘bout as busy as a hibernatin’ bear,” according to the 1944 dictionary Western Words, but we might understand the term better as loitering.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (Unknown Date)

Finally, we get a good closeup of the archetypal cowboy and his traditional attire, complete with waistcoat, necktie and leather chaps. For those who didn’t know, a cowboy is an animal herder who tends cattle on ranches, traditionally on horseback, and has historic roots tracing back to Spain and the earliest European settlers of the Americas.

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Given that these men are still wearing their hats and have gloves in their pockets, it’s a safe bet they came to this saloon straight from the fields after a hard day of work.

Shamrock Saloon – Hazen, Nevada (1905)

As explorers, cowboys, and immigrants journeyed across the American frontier in hopes of striking gold and making a new life for themselves, they typically christened a new site by building a saloon.

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Indeed, saloons became crucial to the leisure time of the working class, but they also served as an important meeting place, given their size and permanent structure in a new town. It wasn’t uncommon to see saloons serve as stations for official local duties, including administrative centers and even places of worship.

The Klondyke Dance Hall and Saloon – Seattle, Washington (1909)

As you might have guessed, the Old West was a pretty prejudiced place, and that extended to the saloons of the towns.

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Most saloons barred women from entering, and the Anti-Saloon League (set up in 1893 to protest saloons) would pressure local police to take licenses from establishments that had the audacity to serve them. However, some places – like those that hosted dances – would welcome the women of the community through their doors.

Unknown Saloon, Unknown State (1903)

Here we have a young woman posing for a photo in an unknown saloon. In the photo, she’s wearing nothing but her Edwardian-era undergarments.

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At that point in time, women’s undergarments consisted of an S-bend corset — this type of corset is super specific for the time period. It has a straight front, and a very sharply curved back, giving it the S-bend name. The corset is meant to minimize the waist all whilst keeping as much volume as possible in the hip and bust era.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1927)

We’d love to believe this was a candid shot of a chaotic, raging saloon, but it’s more likely the picture was staged. Even so, such an image does provide an apt reflection of the violence of the Wild West, where men frequently clashed at watering holes throughout the country.

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After all, without such images, where would we have the inspiration for the classic brawls and shoot-outs we’ve seen in movies for almost 100 years?

Circle City Saloon – Nome, Alaska (1902)

It may seem odd to consider Alaska part of the ‘old frontier’, given just how far west the state is located, as well as its cold climate. But as was the case for many other remote locations in America, the discovery of gold saw an influx of prospectors to The Last Frontier (Alaska’s state nickname).

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This proved true for the isolated town of Nome following the discovery of gold there in 1898. By 1899, the area was organized as the Nome mining district, the town had a population of 10,000, and gold kept turning up on the beaches lining the coast of Nome. In June of 1900, the town average 1000 newcomers a day.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1895)

There’s something to be said for simplicity, right? A primitive structure with a bold sign with the word ‘SALOON’ emblazed across it was enough to draw the crowds, as this picture shows.

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This picture is a stereograph – a nineteenth-century predecessor of the Polaroid. As the American Antiquarian Society explains, “Placed on cardboard were two almost identical photographs, side by side, to be viewed with a stereoscope. When viewed through a stereoscope, the photograph appeared three-dimensional, an awe-inspiring illusion for anyone during that time.”

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Unknown Courthouse and Saloon – Langtry, Texas (1900)

This photo may be of an ‘unknown courthouse and saloon’, but we can safely assume it belonged to Judge Roy Bean, the “Law West of the Pecos”. Bean wasn’t a ‘real’ judge by any modern definition and used his position of power to defraud people during cases and trials.

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The name of this saloon was the Jersey Lilly Saloon, and you can still see the property today! The image shows a rustler being convicted for his crimes by Bean, though we also see a sign advertising “ice cold beer” – where else could you find such a scene except for the Wild West?

Unknown Saloon – Alaska (Early 1900s)

This picture is taken from a saloon in Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush – which was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon, in north-western Canada, after gold was discovered in the area. To get there, many prospectors took the route through the ports of Dyea and Skagway, in Southeast Alaska.

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Returning to this photo, it looks like it’s been staged, which is a shame given the entertaining scene in progress. Alas, if this was a true argument breaking out over the card game, there would surely have been enough movement to disrupt the exposure of the image.

J. W. Swart’s Saloon – Charleston, Arizona (1885)

Charleston was founded in 1879 as a milling site for the silver mines around Tombstone. At its peak in the mid-1880s, Charleston was a bustling community, and boasted four general stores, a meat market, drug store, two restaurants, two laundries, two hotels, several boarding houses and an estimated 13 to 15 saloons.

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Said saloons offered cheap drinks, but the quality was often poor, as drink purveyors would beef up their drink with things like chili powder and harmful chemicals.

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (1890s)

Notice anything different about this picture (apart from the somewhat creepy portrait on the wall)? Well, for one thing, we can see the outline of the man who took the photograph, thanks to the mirror behind the bar.

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Secondly, one of the patrons at the saloon is smiling – a rarity for a frontier-era picture, given that people had to hold the same expression for an extended period due to the exposure time of old pictures. But this gentleman is holding a good grin, even though he might be nursing some sort of ailment, what with the cane and all!

Dew Drop Inn Saloon – Unknown State (c.1900)

It’s hard to tell whether this saloon was still in business when this picture was taken, given some of the boarded-up windows in the foreground.

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What we can also see is that this saloon doesn’t have the swinging “batwing” doors you so often seen in the movies. No, cafe doors were not very practical in real life, given that they posed a massive security issue and proved incapable of keeping out the dust, dirt and critters present in every frontier town.

Toll Gate Saloon – Black Hawk, Colorado (1897)

The tiny city of Black Hawk (with a population of 127 as of 2018) is a historic mining settlement founded in 1859 as a result of the Pike’s Peak Gold Rush, later known as the Colorado Gold Rush, where an estimated 100,000 gold seekers took part in one of the greatest gold rushes in North American history.

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The area blossomed during the late 19th century as prospectors came in search of gold, boosted by the addition of mills (the city’s nickname is “The City of Mills”) and a railroad link to Golden.

Wild West Bar – Unknown State (1900s)

Here we can see a herdsman in full get-up enjoying a presumably hard-earned beverage. An interesting aspect of the cowboy ‘culture’ that many people don’t know about is the regional variations that were present across North America and still exist today.

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There is the “Vaquero” (also known as the “California Tradition”), the Spanish or Mexican cowboy who worked with young, untrained horses, the “Texas Tradition”, the “Florida Cowhunter”, and the “Hawaiian Paniolo”, to name just a few.

Brunswick Saloon – Telluride, Colorado (c.1900)

Telluride was originally founded in 1878 as “Columbia”, but as it shared the same name as a town in California, it was renamed Telluride in 1887 for the gold telluride minerals found in other parts of Colorado.

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While telluride was never found in the town itself, the area’s mines did provide zinc, lead, copper, silver, and other gold ores for some years, making it a quite a wealthy place, as the image shows (telephone lines, metal chimneys and clean wooden pavements were the sign of an affluent town).

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Various Saloons – Rawhide, Arizona (Unknown Date)

Rawhide was formed in the late 1800s as a frontier town, named after Charles “Rawhide” Rawley, a tradesman who wanted to found a place where he could set a store to provide goods, services, and jobs for other settlers in the area.

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Many a voyager passed through Rawhide, primarily via wagon trains – the preferred mode of transport before trains and railroads were built across the land. But traveling by wagon was no easy task, thanks to violent weather, attacks by robbers, and the spread of disease throughout a convoy.

Road House Saloon – Bluff City, Alaska (c.1906)

Alaska’s state motto is “North to the Future” – meant to represent the state as a land of promise. Indeed, as the frontier era in the south of America began to draw to a close, many pioneers headed to Alaska in the hope of finding new treasures.

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Bluff was one such town that sprang up to accommodate these travelers, built in the summer of 1900 as a result of the Nome Gold Rush. The town appeared once on the 1940 U.S. Census as an unincorporated village, though it hasn’t appeared since. However, there are still a few surviving buildings in the area, which is kinda cool.

Behling Bros. Pool Room – Concord, Michigan (1892-1910)

This old pool-hall snap provides an insight into the various styles of the frontier era. Gone is the cowboy style of chaps, caps and checkered shirts, to be replaced with a variant of outfits, including grubby dungarees and sharp waistcoats.

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As you might expect, the clothes and style of a person would vary greatly depending on that individual’s wealth and occupation. Another neat part about this shot – notice the iconic “Coca-Cola” logo on the left of the picture! The company was founded in 1892 in Atlanta, Georgia.

John Hoffman & Co. Saloon & Grocery – Unknown State (Unknown Date)

In the saloon’s heyday, the proprietor controlled every aspect of the business – from keeping the doors open 24/7 or for only an hour a week, to also selling groceries and other items not typically associated with a saloon, it was up to the owner’s whim.

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Even if the establishment had a less than stellar history, shall we say, it didn’t matter – they were allowed to operate freely, as long as they paid their dues to the state authorities.

Santos Saloon – Turlock, California (c.1908)

Turlock is one of the few towns on this list that has survived and flourished to this day (the city has a population of 73,631 as of 2019).

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Turlock flourished as an agricultural town, with large herds of cattle and sheep sold to gold miners and other prospectors as they arrived. Turlock would go on to be known as “The Heart of the Valley” thanks to its agricultural production (agriculture remains the major economic force in the region).

“Temporary” Saloon – Turlock, California (c.1908)

Now this is a unique sight – one that would turn heads even today – a mobile saloon! What a relief the sight would be for weary travelers making their way across the country. There was just one catch – the saloon didn’t actually start serving until it reached Turlock.

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Thanks to the Online Archive of California, we have some additional information about this image: “John J. Vignolo had the Turlock Hotel torn down and replaced it with the Hotel Carolyn that was completed in 1909. This photograph depicts the building that was hauled to Turlock to be used as the ‘temporary’ saloon.”

Unknown Saloon – Unknown State (Unknown Date)

On the wall behind the bar in this photo, you’ll see a vast collection of buffalo horns. These great beasts, also known as American bison, used to roam North America in vast herds, with a population of 60 million in the late 18th century.

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However, with the onslaught of settlers moving into the American West, the bison nearly went extinct, with the species dropping to just 541 animals by 1889. Thankfully the bison survived, and today they number around 31,000, largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves.

Charlie Binder’s Saloon – Ann Arbor, Michigan (1880)

You may happy to learn that Chalie Binder’s Saloon is still operational today – though under its new name of the Alley Bar. In the late 19th century Ann Arbor was filled with breweries that delivered their products to dozens of saloons in the town before prohibition kicked in.

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Even so, some breweries were able to pivot and started producing ice cream instead! It seems that this saloon was able to survive, in one form or another, to this day.

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Unknown Saloon – Round Pond, Oklahoma Territory (1894)

Eventually, the saloons of the Old Frontier would dry up and die out, thanks in large part to the people who came out west with the hope of starting a new – and civil – life.

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Such civility was hard to achieve with the abject lawlessness of saloons, prone as they were to debauchery, fights, and other less-than-pleasant activities. So even before nationwide prohibition kicked in, these drinking dens were already on their way out.

FAQs

What is a saloon in the Wild West? ›

A Western saloon is a kind of bar particular to the Old West. Saloons served customers such as fur trappers, cowboys, soldiers, lumberjacks, businessmen, lawmen, outlaws, miners, and gamblers.

What were saloons really like in the Old West? ›

Instead, the classic 'saloon' was actually nothing more than lean-tos, with some being as simply constructed as tents. These large tents were beacons calling for the socialization of locals and travelers alike, offering a place to sit down and access to a conversation.

What did they drink in Old West saloons? ›

To convince the Indians of the high alcohol content, the peddlers would pour some of the liquor on the fire, as the Indians watched the fire begin to blaze. But the majority of western saloon regulars drank straight liquor — rye or bourbon.

Are there photos of the Wild West? ›

Wild West photographs surface after over 130 years

Unseen photographs showing life on the frontier of the Wild West have surfaced more than 130 years after being captured. The pictures were taken in the 1880s around Colorado and New Mexico territory in the US and have remained unseen by the public ever since.

What Does a saloon girl do? ›

Starved for female companionship, the saloon girl would sing for the men, dance with them, and talk to them – inducing them to remain in the bar, buying drinks and patronizing the games.

What kind of whiskey did the cowboys drink? ›

Rye Whiskey. Most cowboy towns were far from places alcohol was made. Beer is heavy and bulky, whiskey is the most profit per unit weight. Rye was the cheapest grain and made the cheapest whiskey.

What is a saloon girl called? ›

The 49ers in California called them “ladies of the line” or “sporting women.” Cowboys called them “soiled doves.” Kansas trailers knew them by many names, "daughters of sin,” "fallen frails,” "doves of the roost,” and "nymphs du prairie.” Still others referred to the saloon girls as "scarlet ladies,” fallen angels,” " ...

How much did a shot of whiskey cost in 1880? ›

Save this answer. Show activity on this post. Western nineteenth-century saloons were traditionally identified as single bit or two bit saloons: i.e. they either charged a single bit (12.5 cents) for a beer, a glass of whiskey, or a cigar; or they charged twice that amount - 25 cents for each.

What soda did cowboys drink? ›

Ginger ale, root beer, sarsaparilla, lemon and strawberry were among the most popular of the early flavors and are all part of soft drink history.

Why did Old West saloons have swinging doors? ›

The style of the doors was praised by saloon owners as they let fresh air in and smoke out while allowing a cross breeze to cold the air. They also were able to maintain some privacy by having empty doors while still enticing people to come in when they hear the laughter and music.

What kind of beer did cowboys drink? ›

But after the Civil War, beer started showing up in Western saloons and became very popular, as well. It had as many colorful monikers as whiskey: John Barleycorn, purge, hop juice, calobogus, wobbly pop, mancation, let's mosey, laughing water, mad dog, Jesus juice, pig's ear, strike-me-dead, even heavy wet.

Is there any Wild West towns left? ›

Tombstone, Arizona

Branded “The Most Authentic Western Town Left in the United States” Tombstone is home to western attractions, saloons, shops, and restaurants. On historic Allen street, visitors can watch re-enactments of the O.K. Corral gunfight and visit the historic building.

Who lived in the Wild West? ›

The American west had all sorts of people including pioneers, business people, scouts, lawmen, outlaws, gangs, gunslingers, and cowboys.

Did the Wild West exist? ›

The 1860s and the 1890s gave birth to the period known as the Wild West and laid a foundation to its ensuing mythology. It was an era of cowboys, Indians, pioneers, outlaws and gunslingers brought together by the purposes of expansion, defense, greed and reinvention.

What were saloon girls like? ›

Daily Life Of A Saloon Girl

The girls were to dance with the men and get the men to buy them drinks. The men would pay full price for the girl's drink, not realizing that it was really just tea or colored water. The girls received a small commission on the number of drinks they sold plus a weekly salary.

How do girls do saloon hair? ›

How to Do Saloon Girl Hair : Styles for Long Hair - YouTube

How did Old West saloons keep beer cold? ›

Up in your part of the country, they'd harvest ice from the rivers in the winter time and store it in caves or rock cellars. It would usually last most of the summer. Down in Arizona, you'd see signs in front of saloons saying “Cool Beer,” not “Cold Beer.” Wet gunny sacks and sawdust would keep the beer fairly cool.

Did cowboys wear socks? ›

Yes, cowboys wore socks in the old west; they were typically made from wool and were often tall, reaching up to the knee, and had a thick knit that provided both warmth and protection from chafing.

How did cowboys stay warm? ›

They'd Wear (Even Wet) Wool

Even if the men lived outside and it rained, they would wear their wet woolen clothing to stay cozy. Hypothermia can occur anytime when the air temperature is below 60 (yes, 60) degrees Fahrenheit. These outlaw men had to maintain the proper body temperature to avoid it.

What coffee do cowboys drink? ›

Cowboy coffee is essentially French press coffee without a filter. Typically, this drink is made over an open flame, out on the trail, or at a campsite, where a coffee maker (or electricity for that matter) isn't readily available.

What is AB girl in a bar? ›

"B-girl activity" in the US

In the U.S., the term B-girl (an abbreviation of bar girl) is commonly understood to mean a woman who is paid to converse with male patrons and encourage them to buy her drinks.

What did cowboys eat on trail drives? ›

Along the trail, cowboys ate meals consisting of beef, beans, biscuits, dried fruit and coffee. But as cattle drives increased in the 1860s cooks found it harder and harder to feed the 10 to 20 men who tended the cattle.

How did cowboys stay cool? ›

More often than not, people simply drank cool drinks in order to stay cool and refreshed. They also wore light colored clothing made out of breathable cotton. In many cases, people would sleep outside so they could take advantage of the cool desert night breeze. We've sure come a long way since the Wild West days!

What is the main lady in a brothel called? ›

A madam had to monitor the cleanliness of the brothel, including the sheets, which had to be changed several times in an evening, and a stock of wines and liquors for clientele. She was the boss of the brothel and so a madam fired and hired servants, maids, and prostitutes.

Do they drink real beer on Gunsmoke? ›

The Gunsmoke actors actually drank beer, but the whiskey was tea or colored water. Marshall Trimble is Arizona's official historian and vice president of the Wild West History Association.

How much did milk cost in 1860? ›

Prices for 1860, 1872, 1878 and 1882 — Groceries, Provisions, Dry Goods & More
PROVISIONS
QUANTITIESARTICLESAVERAGE RETAIL PRICES (standard gold)
PoundCheese$0.17
BushelPotatoes$1.02
QuartMilk$0.08
20 more rows

What was the average price of a house in 1870? ›

Price of Goods, 1870
Food Prices.
Land$5/acre (avg. 160 acres)$.50 cents/box
Homestead filing fee$14$60
House -- 32'x40' (4 rooms)$700$8
42 more rows

Why did Old West saloons have swinging doors? ›

The style of the doors was praised by saloon owners as they let fresh air in and smoke out while allowing a cross breeze to cold the air. They also were able to maintain some privacy by having empty doors while still enticing people to come in when they hear the laughter and music.

Whats the difference between a saloon and a bar? ›

A saloon is an old-fashioned name for a bar or a tavern. Suggest meeting at the local saloon after work and your friends might give you a funny look, but they'll know what you mean. A saloon is a place to sit drink a beer, though it's much more common these days to call it a bar or a pub.

What kind of food was served in saloons? ›

Some people said that western saloon food was confined to the "Basic Four B's'--sourdough biscuits, beans, beef, and bacon ("overland trout" in cowboyese). Wild onions were sometimes served as a side dish "against scurvy." The chief complaint of travelers was the scarcity of vegetables...

What is a saloon girl called? ›

The 49ers in California called them “ladies of the line” or “sporting women.” Cowboys called them “soiled doves.” Kansas trailers knew them by many names, "daughters of sin,” "fallen frails,” "doves of the roost,” and "nymphs du prairie.” Still others referred to the saloon girls as "scarlet ladies,” fallen angels,” " ...

What kind of beer did cowboys drink? ›

But after the Civil War, beer started showing up in Western saloons and became very popular, as well. It had as many colorful monikers as whiskey: John Barleycorn, purge, hop juice, calobogus, wobbly pop, mancation, let's mosey, laughing water, mad dog, Jesus juice, pig's ear, strike-me-dead, even heavy wet.

How did Old West saloons keep beer cold? ›

Up in your part of the country, they'd harvest ice from the rivers in the winter time and store it in caves or rock cellars. It would usually last most of the summer. Down in Arizona, you'd see signs in front of saloons saying “Cool Beer,” not “Cold Beer.” Wet gunny sacks and sawdust would keep the beer fairly cool.

Why do saloons have small doors? ›

Saloon doors—batwing doors—were designed to allow for ventilation inside the saloon, and to a certain degree cover up the debauchery going on inside, so that it would not easily be seen from the street. Full sized main doors were used to secure the property when closing the saloon at the end of the business day.

What is the oldest saloon in the United States? ›

The White Horse Tavern is the “oldest operating restaurant in the U.S.” and is acknowledged as the 10tholdest in the world. The White Horse Tavern is a National Historic Landmark being America's oldest restaurant, having served guests since 1673.

Why is a bar called a bar? ›

The term derives from the metal or wooden bar (barrier) that is often located along the length of the "bar". Over many years, heights of bars were lowered, and high stools added, and the brass bar remains today. Bars provide stools or chairs that are placed at tables or counters for their patrons.

When did they stop calling bars saloons? ›

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the most common term was "tavern." By 1797, citizens of the newly formed United States were using "barroom," later shortened to "bar." In the 1840s, "saloon" began to catch the public fancy, becoming the favorite term from the 1870s until the advent of nationwide prohibition ...

What did cowboys drink? ›

Cowboys never had a reputation for being very sophisticated connoisseurs. The whiskey they drank was simply fuel for the saloons' many other pastimes, whatever those happened to be. Quality and flavor among whiskies in the late 1800s varied widely.

Do saloons still exist? ›

Home to revelry, rivalry, and a bevy of brews, saloons were the nexus of social and political life in the Wild West. Fortunately for admirers of antiquity and ale, many of these taverns still stand to this day as a reminder of the gunslinging spirit of westward expansion.

Did they drink water in the Wild West? ›

Cowboys knew where the springs were and drank from them, or had a well and got their water from it.

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