Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (2022)

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (1)

Here we look at the essential elements that make classic 1940s hairstyles, like rolls, pomps, curls, and waves. There were many ways to combine these elements. We also take a look at what influenced the hairstyles of the 1940s and some of the common hair accessories seen during this era.

Influences on the Hairstyles

Film Stars

Actresses such as Betty Grable, Anna Neagle, Veronica Lake, Dorothy Lamour, Rita Hayworth, and Ava Gardner epitomised glamour during the 1940s. They provided escapism from the everyday dreariness of war.

The influence film stars had on the public didn’t escape the notice of officials in the United States of America. Long hair was hazardous where machinery was operated, like in factories and on farms, and too many accidents were happening.

In the hope of encouraging women to cut their hair short, thus reducing the risk of being injured or worse at work, the officials asked Veronica Lake to cut her trademark “peekaboo” long locks. Ms Lake kindly obliged.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (2)

World War II

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (3)

Wartime influenced how working women wore their hair. Being in fields, factories and the armed services, women needed styles that would not get caught in machinery or be in the way in general.

Those in the armed services had rules to follow – for example, hair had to be off the collar while on duty. A hat was part of the uniform, and hair had to be appropriately dressed. Shorter hairstyles suited this type of work.

In the UK, washing hair was a luxury because products like shampoo were hard to obtain, and water was rationed. Scarves protected the hair from dirt when working in fields and factories. They also hid a bad hair day.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (4)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (5)
(Video) Vintage 1940's Beauty Masterclass | Makeup, Hair and Body

After the War

After the war ended, there was a gradual shift away from utility clothing and the sometimes practical hairstyling of the war. New, more luxurious fabrics, hair products and makeup slowly became available, though some rationing was in place until 1954 in the UK. People wanted to leave the drabness of war behind them.

Christian Dior’s revolutionary “New Look” in 1947 embraced the new fabrics and ignored rationing in favour of a desire to move away from wartime skimping. His fabric-hungry designs influenced fashion and designers for years to come.

Hairstyles became looser and less structured looking. Victory rolls and pompadours were taking a backseat to sleekly waved hair.

Magazines

Pictures in magazinesshowed very groomed and sleek film stars. Their hairstyles would be admired and copied by women as much as possible.

However, the everyday working-class womanwould not have the time, money or personal hairstylist to spend on looking immaculate, especially during the war years. Nonetheless, they made the best of themselves and always managed to look well turned out.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles in General

Hairstyles in the 1940s were as varied as the women wearing them. And hair did not rigidly follow a dictated fashion, as seen in some previous decades. For example, hair could be short, long or mid-length and dressed according to an individual’s situation, tastes, and hair type.

Whatever hairstyle a woman chose, hair was always feminine, soft, and dressed off and away from the face (except fringes). If there was a parting, hair was generally parted to one side, though the occasional centre parting can be seen in old photographs.

An older womanmay have carried on wearing the short waved styles of the 1930s (especially in the early 1940s), as it was familiar and old habits die hard. Alternatively, they would likely adopt one of the shorter and easy-to-keep styles of the era.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (6)

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (7)

1940s Hairstyle Elements

Curls & Waves

Waves were soft, not like the crisp crested waves of the 1920s and ’30s. Curls were for dressing up the hair. For example, on the opposite side to a roll, or piled on the crown area for an updo.

Hair was always set, even for a brushed-smooth hairstyle, as bone-straight hair was not fashionable during the 1940s. Additionally, the hair also needed setting to achieve the lift and movement required of the hairstyles.

For those with spare cash, hair was set or permed at the hairdressers. Most women, however, set their hair at home using pin curls, barrel curls or by twisting it up in rags. Hair could be left overnight in pin curls or under a scarf or snood while at work. It was ready to dress out in the morning or for a social event.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (8)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (9)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (10)

Rolls

Rolls are quintessential 1940s and an essential part of defining the overall look for the decade.

They were a flexible element of a hairstyle, so women could shape and position the rolls as they wanted – for example, the top, the sides, the forehead, or around the nape. They could be worn symmetrically on each side of the face or not be symmetrical at all. Additionally, the hair could be brushed smooth or have a wave.

The shape and stability of a roll could be helped with backcombing or by rats. Hairpins would keep everything in place.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (11)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (12)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (13)
(Video) 1940s hair and makeup tutorial

Pageboy

The pageboy is a smooth hairstyle with a curled-under roll going all around the sides and back of the hair. This style suited medium to long hair, as it had the length needed to achieve the roll.Veronica Lake wore a long pageboy.

The Victory Roll

Rolls had been part of 1940s hairstyling since the turn of the decade. Avictory rollwas a particular type of roll. It was a tight sausage at the back of the hair rolled upwards, rather than turned under like the pageboy.

Women also used totie the top of an old stockingright around their heads like a headband and roll the hair over it, creating the victory roll.

“Our hair had to be kept above our collars on duty. We used to make a head band out of the top of an old stocking and roll our hair round the band. This style was known as the ‘Victory Roll’. Afterwards, when brushed out, our hair turned under into a pageboy style quite easily.”[1]

The name most likely came from pilots who, on returning from battle and having shot down an enemy plane, did a “victory roll” in their fighter, corkscrewing through the air before landing.

“Another style I adopted was a style called the ‘victoryroll’ that the A.T.S. and W.A.A.F. wore coiled round a stocking.”[2]

Nowadays, it seems that all rolls inspired by the 1940s are referred to by bloggers and the like as victory rolls. However, in 1940’s Britain, thevictory roll was a specific shape– as described above.

The Fringe

In the 1940s, hair was dressed off the face. Therefore, if a woman did have a fringe, it was either dressed into the hairstyle, pinned to one side, or made into a feature. Hair was never just left flopped onto the face – it always had shape and purpose.

For example, the fringe could be set with an S-shaped wave and dressed to one side. Alternatively, it could be a mass of curls that sat high and slightly forward onto the face, asBetty Grablewore. There was also the full-forward roll that sat on the forehead – sleek and smooth like a barrel.

Pompadours

Pompadours stand high up from the forehead, with the hair going back off the face. They could be either smooth, half-waved or completely waved. A pompadour was essentially a big roll, albeit one that stood higher off the face.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (14)

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (15)

Black Women's Hair

The vast majority of black women in the 1940s straightened their hair. It was simply the done thing to attain employment and be part of society. It wouldn’t be until the1960sbefore this started to change, and natural afro hair was more accepted and embraced.

Straightening was a two-step process. Firstly, a protective pomade was applied to the hair. Then, a heated metal comb was run through, transforming tight curls into glossy straight hair.The straightened hair could be dressed into waves and rolls and pinned up in typical 1940s hairstyles.

Women with straightened hair would avoid getting their hair wet because the hair would go curly again.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (16)
(Video) 1940s brush out ✨ #vintage #hairstyle #brushout #1950sstyle #makeup

Hair Accessories

Braids

Braids were popular throughout the decade. If someone didn’t have long hair, hairpieces could be used instead and pinned into the hair.

Hairpieces came in natural colours, thoughcontrasting colourswere also available. A strip of material or a scarf could also add colourful detail to a plait.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (17)
Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (18)

Grips, Combs & Slides

Hair grips (or bobby pins) were rare during the war, so women looked after them. Grips were shiny and worn visibly. For extra decoration, a small ribbon bow could be attached.

Combs and slides were made from Bakelite to look like tortoiseshell. If granny had some old ones knocking about, they might have even been real tortoiseshell.

Grips and combs were used to keep rolls in place. Slides were used to keep the side hair pinned out of the way or to hold a wave in place.

Hairnets

Hairnets were used to keep the back of the hair neat. Because they were less visible, they were considered to be more sophisticated than a snood.

Hats

Hats were a fun part of a woman’s attire, dressing up their otherwise plain clothes. There was no single style or shape that was stand out. Everything was worn, from small pillboxes and berets to wide-brimmed hats. Hairstyles could be easily adapted to fit the hat – or find the hat to suit the hairstyle!

Popular hats include:

  • Beret– made from wool or rayon felt and came in a variety of plain colours. Worn either to one side or pushed straight back off the face.
  • Pillbox– stiff and round, held onto the head with a hatpin and worn on top of the head or at an angle.
  • Miniature– felt or straw often with a brim. Pinned on with a hatpin and worn at a fun angle.
  • Fedora-style– wide-brimmed, felt hats with an indent in the top.
  • Turban– came in various materials and colours.

Adornments could dress up a hat – for example, feathers, a veil, bows, beads, flowers, or ribbons.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (19)

Headscarves

Scarves were worn to keep the hair out of the face or help keep it protected from dirt. Theycame in different materials, sizes and patterns.

There were many ways to wear a scarf, including:

  • Plaited into the hair and tied up.
  • Folded into a triangle and tied on top of the head, like a turban.
  • Worn around the head and knotted under the chin.

Often women fashioned the scarf into something more than just a practical head covering, influenced by stars likeCarmen Miranda, who made wearing a turban chic.

Flowers

A popular way to easily dress up the hair. It was also a versatile way to add a bit of decoration. Fresh blooms could be used, but artificial flowers were popular. Made from silk or rayon, they came in various colours and styles.

Flowers could come already attached headband, comb or pins.

(Video) MAQUILLAGE DE 1940 - Pinup (tutorial) | Laurence Carbonneau

Rats

Not an accessory that was seen but essential to creating some of the 1940s hairstyles.Rats were used to bulk out rolls, keeping the structure more solid and stable. They were made from old stockings stuffed with either more old stockings or hair taken from the woman’s hairbrush.

Modern rats are the squishy foam doughnuts and sausages found in hair suppliers and accessory shops. A 1940s woman would roll her hair around the rat in the same way we use modern rats today, then use hairpins to secure it all in place.

Ribbons & Bows

Ribbons were a bright and cheerful way to dress up hair. They could be used as decoration in several ways, including:

  • Tied around the head and finished with a bow on the top or side.
  • Fashioned into a bow and pinned into the hair.
  • Mothers would often tie a ribbon bow to a hair grip to add a bit of colour when pinning their daughter’s hair back.

Ribbons were made from a purpose-made material or strips of fabric.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (22)

Snoods

Snoods were a crocheted bag, often homemade, used to keep the back of the hair neat. The hair in the snood could be styled in a roll, left in soft curls or even pin curled, ready to be dressed out later.

Factory or field workers may have worn a snood to help keep hair out of the way.

Sometimes snoods were made from the same material as a dress to create a matching item.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (23)

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (24)

Turban

A turban was a length of material made from things like soft wool or rayon crepe. It was tied around the head and the long ends tucked underneath. The turban could be left as it was or decorated with things like pompoms or flowers.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (25)

Setting Hair

During the war, many products were hard to come by. Women made do with whatever they could get. For example, setting lotion was made from things found in the home, like beer or sugar water.

Pipe cleaners, rags or pin curls would be used to twist and set the hair. Once dry, the hair could be brushed out and dressed as required. Wealthy women could afford to visit the hairdresser and have their hair set. Those who didn’t have the money just set their hair at home.

Electric curling irons were now available, but some women will have continued to use the old hot irons to create waves.

After the war, cosmetic products became more readily available, like home perms. It was easier to have permed hair, as it simply snapped it into shape, plus they lasted a long time. It was also less time consuming than the daily setting with rollers or rags.

Women's 1940s Hairstyles: An Overview - Hair & Makeup Artist Handbook (26)

Find Out More

Sources:

[1] © Rhoda Woodward [2] © Joyce Hilton. WW2 People's War - an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The archive can be found at bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar.

Corson, R. (2000). Fashions in Hair: The First Five Thousand Years. Peter Owen.

(Video) 1950's Makeup | Vintage Tutorial by Ern Westmore 1951

Peiss, K. (2011). Hope In A Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture. First University of Pennsylvania.

Sherrow V. (2001). For Appearances' Sake: The Historical Encyclopedia of Good Looks, Beauty and Grooming. Greenwood.

FAQs

What hairstyles were popular in the 1940s? ›

Some of the most popular 1940s hairstyles were borne from these lifestyle realities.
...
Retro 1940s Hairstyles
  • Pin Curls. ...
  • Regular Rolls. ...
  • Victory Rolls. ...
  • Pageboy. ...
  • Sideswept Pin Curls. ...
  • Victory Roll Updo. ...
  • Evening-Ready. ...
  • Voluminous Bob.
23 Feb 2002

How do I style my hair like 1940s? ›

For this style. At all I wanted to show you that however you roll your hair as long as you curl it

What hair products did they use in the 1940s? ›

There were several types of hair styling tonics for men in the 1940s. Brilliantine cream or Brylcreem was an oily, sticky, Vaseline-like gel that was used for the slick back look. Hair oil added shine without the hold and was used for wave hairstyles. It was often scented with lavender and other light fragrances.

How do you do a victory roll hairstyle? ›

And apply some hairspray to control any flyaways holding the hair in the middle we're going to wrap

How did girls in the 40s do their hair? ›

Hair was usually worn shoulder-length or a little bit longer, cut straight with no bangs. A bit of layering on the ends gave flat hair more volume and helped achieve the curly look needed for most 1940s hairstyles.

How do you do a 1940s head scarf? ›

1940s Headscarf Turban Tutorial VINTAGE TIPS & TRICKS - YouTube

How do you make vintage waves? ›

Vintage Waves - YouTube

How do you make your hair roll? ›

Victorias Secret Hair Tutorial (With Velcro Rollers) - YouTube

How did people wash their hair in the 1940s? ›

Bathing was done frequently, but many women only washed their hair once or twice a week. The all important bathing cap was used not only in the shower, but also when swimming, so that the hair didn't get wet. Between washes the hair was often set into a wave pattern using rags, pin curls, or curlers.

How do you do 1940s makeup? ›

1940s Makeup Tutorial - Part 1 - YouTube

What did Cary Grant use in his hair? ›

From now on I devoured every night the book and found among other things a small passage, in which it is mentioned that Cary Grant used a pomade. A black coloring pomade to make look his dark brown hair in his films appear even more brilliant.

How do you make a vintage fringe roll? ›

HOW TO roll VICTORY ROLLS 6 DIFFERENT ways - Fitfully Vintage

How do you do bumper bangs? ›

Bumper Bangs Tutorial: Easiest DIY Hair Rat - YouTube

What era are victory rolls from? ›

Victory rolls are a women's hairstyle that was popular from 1940 to 1945, with a recent rise during the 21st century, characterized by voluminous curls of hair that are either on top of the head or frame the face.

What did Ladies Wear in the 1940s? ›

Women's clothes of the 1940s were typically modeled after the utility clothes produced during war rationing. Squared shoulders, narrow hips, and skirts that ended just below the knee were the height of fashion. Tailored suits were also quite popular.

What influenced the hairstyles of the 1940s? ›

Despite the war, women in the 1940s were still able to create jaw-dropping looks simply by styling their hair. 1940s hairstyles were largely inspired by actresses during an era of glamor that provided a sense of escapism from the war.

What is a middy haircut? ›

These Haircut charts are taken from the book 1940s Hairstyles by Daniela Turudich. The Standard Middy is cut at 4" at the longest point, tailors into a rounded "U" with heavy blunt layering that is also cut at 4" long and has face framing layering. Styled out, this cut gives an Elizabeth Taylor kind of look.

How do you tie a vintage hair scarf? ›

How To Tie A Scarf Vintage Style | 2 Quick and Easy Ways - YouTube

How do you tie a retro hair scarf? ›

EASY PIN UP HAIRSTYLES: 9 ways to tie a headscarf - YouTube

How do you tie a 1940s turban? ›

Easy 1940s Tuban Tutorial (3 ways to tie a turban) VINTAGE ... - YouTube

What colors were popular in the 1940's? ›

1940s Fashion Colors

Year-round colors were navy blue, brown, beige, black, red, green (kelley green, mint green, aqua green), grey, rose pink, copen blue (a medium blue), white and golden yellow. In the summer, lighter versions of these colors were common: pastel pink, pastel yellow, pastel blue, etc.

What were 1940s dresses like? ›

They wore tailored skirt suits, beautiful dresses with full skirts and cinched-in at the waist, and embraced androgynous style with suits or a pair of wide-legged trousers and monochrome flats. They certainly weren't afraid to experiment.

What type of clothes did people wear in the 1940s? ›

Lace, passementerie, silk tassels, fringe, and beading details all returned to late '40s outfits. Blouses and sweaters were paired with short fitted jackets or shoulder capes. Two important accessories that completed every outfit were wrist length gloves and fedora, pillbox, or bicorne hats.

How do I get big vintage curls? ›

Vintage Hair Tutorial - YouTube

How do you do Veronica Lake curls? ›

Glossy Veronica Lake Waves // How To Curl Your Hair [CC] - YouTube

How do you do vintage curls on short hair? ›

How To: Soft Retro Waves and 5 Ways To Accessorize Your Short Hair

Do you put rollers in wet or dry hair? ›

Always apply rollers on dry hair. Before application, mist hair spray to hold the curl, hairspray before and after is a good idea. For volume, add the roller under the hair section after taking the hair forward, never pull out the roller, gently drop it.

What can u use instead of hair rollers? ›

Luckily, that means you can get lustrous curls even if you don't own a curling iron or set of hot rollers.
...
  • 1 A Headband. ...
  • 2 Go with Buns. ...
  • 3 An Old T-shirt. ...
  • 4 Braids. ...
  • 5 A Tube Sock. ...
  • 6 Sock Braid. ...
  • 7 An Old Pillowcase.

How do you do a rock and roll hairstyle? ›

How to Get Rock N' Roll Waves Hair Tutorial - YouTube

What influenced the hairstyles of the 1940s? ›

Despite the war, women in the 1940s were still able to create jaw-dropping looks simply by styling their hair. 1940s hairstyles were largely inspired by actresses during an era of glamor that provided a sense of escapism from the war.

How do you do 40s curls? ›

40s Brush Out On Long Hair | Tutorial - YouTube

How did WWII affect women's hairstyles? ›

How did World War II influence women's hairstyles? 4) The War influenced women's hairstyles because they were very limited fashion choices for clothes, so women turned toward hair to express themselves, 5. Why did men begin to grow their hair longer in the 1960s?

What are the three victory hairstyles popular during World War II? ›

The Middy Haircut

Because the middy is short on top and at the sides, it is the perfect haircut for victory rolls. There were three popular middy cuts in the 1940's – the middy baby haircut, the middy haircut and the middy plus.

What did Ladies Wear in the 1940s? ›

Women's clothes of the 1940s were typically modeled after the utility clothes produced during war rationing. Squared shoulders, narrow hips, and skirts that ended just below the knee were the height of fashion. Tailored suits were also quite popular.

What is a middy haircut? ›

These Haircut charts are taken from the book 1940s Hairstyles by Daniela Turudich. The Standard Middy is cut at 4" at the longest point, tailors into a rounded "U" with heavy blunt layering that is also cut at 4" long and has face framing layering. Styled out, this cut gives an Elizabeth Taylor kind of look.

Who influenced fashion in the 1940s? ›

When it comes to women who defined 40s fashion, leading actresses of the Hollywood Golden Era were it. We're talking of course of the likes of Ava Gardner, Bette Davis, Rita Haywarth, Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, Katharine Hepburn and Doris Day.

How do you do 1940s makeup? ›

1940s Makeup Tutorial - Part 1 - YouTube

How do you make vintage waves? ›

Vintage Waves - YouTube

How do you do finger waves? ›

How to do Fingerwaves for Beginners - YouTube

Why was red lipstick popular during WWII? ›

During World War II, red lips had their bold second act of defiance. Adolf Hitler "famously hated red lipstick," Felder said. In Allied countries, wearing it became a sign of patriotism and a statement against facism.

How did World war 2 affect fashion in the 1940s? ›

With the first half of the 1940s dominated by World War II, fashion stalled. Both men and women were often seen in their uniforms during the war and, if they were not, their clothing styles were dictated by rationing and Utility clothing.

How do you get Veronica Lake hair? ›

Glossy Veronica Lake Waves // How To Curl Your Hair [CC] - YouTube

When did victory rolls go out of style? ›

After 1945 the popularity of the victory rolls declined as the style was now to have the top of the head smooth, however some women still wore victory rolls on the sides of their head.

What was the most popular hairstyle in the 1950's? ›

The Bouffant

Perhaps one of the most prevalent styles of the 1950s, the bouffant, which would later give way to the amped-up, towering "beehive" style, involved dramatic volume, backcombing and ample use of hairspray.

How do you do pin Up Girl hair? ›

6 PIN UP looks for BEGINNERS ( QUICK and EASY VINTAGE

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